Slayers by C.J. Hill

This amazing book comes out today! I was lucky enough to win an ARC (advance reader’s copy) on C.J. Hill’s blog last week, so I’ve already read it.

And loved pretty much every second of it.

Tori Hampton, the sixteen-year-old daughter of a senator, has to talk her parents into letting her go to St. George and the Dragon Camp. She’s wanted to go for years, but once she’s there, well, she’s not sure she really wants to stay. First of all, the camp is a little primitive. When the camp director sends her off with a couple of buff boys to the advanced camp–hidden in the trees two miles away, complete with its own stable, gun range, and mysterious large building–the only way she decides to stay is to prove herself to the other advanced campers who somehow have it in their minds that she’s pampered and unable to handle the rigors of advanced dragon camp.

Even after Tori finds out about the other campers’ special powers she still isn’t convinced she’s where she wants to be, and it goes double when they tell her that dragons really do exist and, oh, by the way, she’s got special DNA from her ancestors that makes her a dragon slayer.

Not exactly what she was looking for in a summer camp.

While dragon camp wasn’t exactly what Tori was looking for, this book is exactly what I was looking for.

It has all the things I look for in a great book: a strong voice, interesting characters, a little magic, and kissing. There were some unexpected twists in the plot that were believable and enjoyable, as well as some awesome fight/battle scenes. And a dragon, naturally. This is the first book in the series, so be ready for a conclusion that isn’t entirely conclusive, as well as a couple of major plot points/mysteries that carry on to the next book (which I am already anxiously awaiting).

This is a great YA fantasy pick. Simply thumbing through it to refresh myself with a few details to write this review made me want to start from the beginning and read it again.

Paranormalcy by Kiersten White

I stole this picture of the book cover (very cool cover, no?) from Kiersten White’s website, although she makes it sound as though her blog is the real place to be. Since I’m having trouble remembering to feed my children three meals per day (is lunch really necessary?) I haven’t blog-surfed for awhile, but after reading her book I’m pretty sure I’d like what I found there.

Paranormalcy was fast, fun, funny, and [quickly thinking of another ‘f’ word . . . ] fantastic. I had picked it up a few weeks ago, but every time I went to read it I ended up grabbing something else instead. I’ve become a bit burned out on the whole YA paranormal genre–I mean, I liked the Twilight series just as much as the next person, but the glut that flooded the market there for awhile made me long for regular old teenagers without any special abilities.

So . . . I was intrigued by the cover and the premise, but I couldn’t bring myself to start reading it for the longest time. Once I started it, though, I burned through that puppy in a matter of hours. As I said before, fast, fun, funny, and fantastic. (Hm. That joke was okay the first time around, but not so much the second time.)

Our heroine, Evie (short for Evelyn, naturally) works for the International  Paranormal Containment Agency. Besides being tough, smart, and pretty, she has a tazer. Which is enough for your average reader to completely fall in love with her, right?

Evie “tags and bags” various paranormals–werewolves, vampires, the occasional hag–and lives at the IPCA center with her best friend (who happens to be a mermaid–thank goodness for language-translating technology, right?). Evie’s own special talent of seeing through glamours makes her assistance invaluble. But when a new paranormal is captured, and large numbers of paranormals are turning up dead, Evie makes a discovery about her own classification that makes her question everything her life has been built on.

Again, the spoiler thing. I don’t want to say too much. I will say that I loved all the characters; they rang completely true. Beyond that, the entire book was fresh (ooh, another ‘f’!) and had a twist to the standard paranormal fare that I completely enjoyed. The book was serious and scary, but not dark. Evie always has hope, even when things look bleakest.  I love that about a main character.

Another thing I love is that the second book, Supernaturally, is out in less than a month. In fact, the only thing I would like better is if the entire series was already written so I wouldn’t have to wait.

[I just checked out Kiersten’s blog despite needing to pack for a three-week trip to my homeland. It’s hilarious and awesome. Add some paranormalcy to that and you’ve got her book: um, Paranormalcy.]

Sean Griswold’s Head by Lindsey Leavitt

(Picture stolen from Lindsey Leavitt’s website.)

I hadn’t heard of Lindsey Leavitt two months ago; I read Sean Griswold’s Head and rapidly inhaled all the other books she’s written (of which there are two, and of which I may post another review in the coming weeks) within a two week period–and that was only because I had to wait for one on the hold list in the library.

Sean Griswold’s Head is Young Adult Literature at its finest. Payton, the narrator, has a wonderful voice. It’s distinct, it’s believable, and it’s real. Her reactions and her growth in the book are spot on.

In the book, Payton discovers–in a not-so-great-way–that her beloved father has MS. It’s not only Payton’s journey into looking deeper at the relationships she has, but her ultimate acceptance of what she can and can not do about things that happen in her life.

I am purposely vague when writing reviews because I hate reading reviews where the story gets spoiled, SPOILER ALERTS notwithstanding. But I feel like I can say a few of the things that I loved about this book:

  • There are no mean girls. When I was in high school, there wasn’t a clique of popular, mean girls who tried to spoil everything for everybody else. Our cheerleaders were not only nice, they were super nice. Instead of having a stock mean girl character, Ms. Leavitt pulls some other interesting characters out of her head that make the story that much more believable.
  • There is a brother her best friend tries to flirt with. Having five brothers of my own, I know that this does indeed happen–but generally only with newer friends, since the friends that knew my brothers in junior high weren’t all that impressed with them later.
  • There aren’t mean girls, but there is a fight with her best friend. And she has to agonize over the resolution. I like it.
  • A mangled cat toy given as a gift. Need I say more?
  • And then, there’s Sean’s head. And Sean. Ahh. Seriously, you need to read this book.

Wait, did you read that last sentence? Seriously, you need to read this book. You can thank me later.

Summerland by Michael Chabon

Product Details

I realize I’ve been neglecting this blog. What can I say? Stuff happens, and I’ve had a lot of ‘stuff’ that has happened to me throughout the past ten months that hasn’t been all that pleasant and didn’t exactly fit into my life plan. Which, interestingly enough, is one of the reasons I ended up liking this book so much.

Don’t get me wrong: this book is weird. It isn’t my normal fare, and I didn’t understand a lot of it. (There’s some part of my brain that shuts down after 12 different kinds of magical creatures are introduced. I can’t help it. So the shmucks put into the story after that get quickly dropped into ‘supporting cast’ and I hope for the best.) However, I think one of the great tests of a book is how it resonates. This book completely resonated with me.

Ethan Feld is our hero, a 10- or 11- or 12-year-old boy who lives alone with his father on an island off of Washington state. His mother died a year previously, so they moved from Colorado to a property where his dad had the space to perfect the mini-zeppelins he had invented. Anyway, the book goes on (and on and on–it’s pretty long) where Ethan–who is not really very good at baseball–is the champion needed to save this world along with the three others that are connected to it. In the end, it comes down to (you guessed it!) a baseball game.

There’s a lot more to it than that, of course, but the part I liked the most is near the end. Ethan can’t find any of his friends and he seems surrounded by evil henchmen (although I guess they would actually be called ‘henchwolves’ and other things like that, since they weren’t men) and he is completely exhausted. In his hands, he holds the last thing that keeps the four worlds from collapsing, a baseball bat carved from The Tree. He tries not to fall asleep, but he’s just so very tired.

It’s this moment when Coyote (the bad guy) sends in his weapon: the ghost of Ethan’s mother. She’s crying, and she comes to Ethan, and this is what happens:

“Her sobbing ceased, then, though its ghost or echo shook her frail body from time to time. He could feel the bones through her skin, just as he had when she lay dying in the hospital in Colorado Springs, those hollow angel bones of hers. The sweetness of that bitter memory, of her embrace, of holding her again and hearing her voice, filled his heart so full that all the old healed places in it were broken all over again. And in that moment he felt–for the first time that optimistic and cheerful boy allowed for himself to feel–how badly made life was, how flawed. No matter how richly furnished you made it, with all the noise and variety of Something, Nothing always found a way in, seeped through the cracks and patches.”

Just as Ethan is about to give in and hand the bat over to his mother, it catches on an injured part of his hand. The pain wakes him up enough to realize that it isn’t really his mother, simply La Llorona posing as her. Ethan yanks the bat back and she goes away, and then this:

“The grief of his mother’s death was returned to him, then; it resumed its right and familiar place: a part of life, a part of the story of Ethan Feld, a part of the world that was, after all, a world of stories, tragic and delightful, and, on the whole, very much the better for it. The memory of Dr. Victoria Jean Kummerman Feld was Something, unalterably Something, a hodag’s egg that no amount of Nothing could ever hope to touch or dissolve.”

The writing is completely mesmerizing, and I think the resonance comes because that beautiful writing and that complicated story have, at the core, truth. There were so many truths for me, at this time of my life. The truth that life is full of tragic and delightful parts; the truth that even when you feel inadequate you still need to give it the best you’ve got; the truth of good friends; the truth that painful experiences become a part of our own personal stories and that without them the story isn’t the same; and the truth that sometimes pain gives us the power to do what we need to do.

Read this book. See if it resonates with you.

How Not to Spend Your Senior Year by Cameron Dokey

Cameron Dokey has quite a few re-written fairy tales out there that are quite lovely. (I just read The Storyteller’s Daughter and loved it.) In fact, that’s what I was searching for on the library’s website when I found this book and thought I’d give it a try. With her other books, Dokey has a gentle, magical storytelling voice, so I was doubly impressed that she handled the chick lit genre so masterfully.

Jo O’Connor and her father move a lot. No, really–a lot. Jo switched school three times every year in grade school. It isn’t until she’s older that she realizes this is odd. But by then, her father has slowed down some, and has promised Jo she’ll be at one school for her entire senior year.

Because of all these moves, Jo has perfected the art of blending in and being unnoticable. Except–on her first day at Beacon High–she gets noticed. By what she calls a “big man on campus”. It isn’t long before she’s fallen hard for Alex (and he for her) and has actually made a few friends.

Just when things are going so well–and right after Alex asked Jo to the prom–her dad tells her to pack her bags.

When Jo refuses, her father tells her why they’ve had to move so often in the past–it’s kind of a homemade witness protection program. A trial is coming up, one where her father is supposed to testify, so they are in danger because the thug in jail has connections. So–Jo and her father (with the help of Detective Mortensen) fake their own deaths in a car accident.

However, when Jo arrives at Royer High in her new identity as Claire Calloway, she’s assigned to a inter-city student exchange for her journalism class . . . at Beacon High School.

I’m not summing it up very well, so let me just say this: it’s very funny.

I want to read it again before I take it back.

Highly recommended for teenage girls.

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

I heard about this book awhile ago, and I’ve been on the library’s hold list for months waiting for it. When I finally got it, though, I didn’t read it right away. I was pretty sure that once I started reading it, the book would basically possess me until I finished it.

I was right.

I picked the book up a few nights ago and read the entire thing from cover to cover, even though it wasn’t the most judicious thing to do.

Katniss Everdeen, a sixteen-year-old living in the 12th District of Panem, hunts daily beyond “the fence” to feed her mother and sister. The book opens on the day of the reaping, a yearly occurence where a boy and a girl from each district is chosen by lottery to travel to the Capitol to compete in the Hunger Games. When Katniss’s younger sister, Primrose, is chosen, Katniss volunteers to take her place.

The Hunger Games themselves are the epitome of barbarism: two teenagers from each of the twelve districts are put in some sort of environment to fight.

To the death.

While the entire country is forced to watch on a twisted reality show.

Suzanne Collins’s writing is masterful; I identified and sympathized so completely with the characters I had already cried before page 25. Katniss and her internal struggles were completely believable–from annoyance to rebellion to fear to love to confusion, her voice was absolutely true to her character. While the subject is horrifying, Collins did not dwell on violence. There were no pages I felt like I had to skip because it was too graphic.

I don’t want to say any more, since I don’t want to spoil anything for you. Let me just say this: I can’t wait for the sequel to come out.

Highly recommended for older teens and adults.

I also read the Underland Chronicles by the same author last year, beginning with Gregor the Overlander. Geared for a younger audience, they are fast-paced, well-written, and believably fantasical. I thoroughly enjoyed them. I’d recommend the series for readers ages 8 and up.

My Fair Godmother by Janette Rallison

I have to start out by saying I’m a big fan of Janette Rallison. I have loved all of her books. She has a way of writing that is both concise and witty. Her latest book did not disappoint.

Savannah Delano was dumped by her boyfriend in order to date her older sister, Jane–after Savannah bought a prom dress.While in the throes of her despair, Savannah somehow summons a fairy godmother. Unfortunately for Savannah, Chrysanthemum Everstar (and, yes, I know how to spell ‘chrysanthemum’ from watching Anne of Green Gables) wasn’t particularly studious at fairy school, and so she’s only fair at this godmothering/wish granting business.  Savannah’s wishes are disastrous, sending her first back to the Middle Ages to work for weeks as Cinderella, luckily escaping before being stuck with a decidedly uncharming prince. Then, as Snow White, Savannah learns it isn’t enough for her to be adored as beautiful but brainless. Savannah’s final wish–to have a real prince to take her to prom–is the worst of all, sending a boy from school to the Middle Ages. Savannah, who lived in the Middle Ages for both her prior wishes, feels terrible and sets out to rescue Tristan.

Comedy, romance, and a plot that twists surprisingly until all ends are tied (except Chryssy–which I hope means we’ll see her again in another book) made for a highly enjoyable read.

Thank you, Janette Rallison! I loved My Fair Godmother.

I highly recommend this book for teenagers.